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If you’re looking for things to do in the Cotswolds, then why not consider visiting one of the regions many museums? The vast selection of museums means that whether you’re a modern day culture vulture or love learning about your roots, there’s something for everybody. You can find these museums located in some of the country’s most decadent locations providing a fabulous visit for food, drink and staying over.

Old Mill, Lower Slaughter

View of Lower Slaughter, the prettiest village in the Cotswolds

Voted the most beautiful village in the Cotswolds, Lower Slaughter’s history dates all the way back to 1086. The museum experience begins as soon as you enter this quaint medieval village, as you journey along the River Eye and sample some of The Cotswold’s most orgasmic ice cream. For a small entry fee of £7.00, you’ll be guided through this historical Old Mill and learn about bread making and the machinery which makes the mill work. Before you leave, don’t forget to visit the gift and craft shop to pick up some truly unique and unusual souvenirs from your visit.


Roman Baths, Bath

The impressive Roman Baths in Bath

Treat your family to the experience of a lifetime and explore the infamous Roman Baths.  This well-preserved Roman site dates all the way back to 70AD, meaning that there is quite literally 1000s of years of history just waiting to be discovered. For *£48.00 you can enjoy walking tours, photo opportunities and quality family time in one of Northern Europe’s finest historic sites.


Cotswold Motoring Museum, Bourton-on-the-Water

TV superstar Brum at the Cotswolds Motoring Museum

If you’re visiting the Cotswolds with a car enthusiast, or perhaps you are a petrol head yourself, this Bourton-On-The-Water car museum is a must. Explore the captivating journey of motoring through the 20th century with interactive activities across the seven showrooms (including a ride on TV car superhero, Brum). Nestled in the idyllic location of Bourton-on-the-Water, the museum compliments a great day out for the whole family, for as little as *£16.80.


The Corinium Museum, Cirencester

Cirencester, otherwise known as the “Capital of The Cotswolds”, has an abundance of history dating back to the Aglo Saxon, Roman and medieval eras. The Corinium Museum tells the story of the Town’s history through well lit and high spec galleries ensuring each and every member of the family receives that wow experience (for a mere £15.00). Enjoy mosaics, artefacts and so much more during your next trip round the Cotswolds.


National Waterways Museum, Gloucester

If you like hip cafes, designer shops and a little bit of history, then the Gloucester Docks is the perfect destination for you. Not only is the architecture of the docks beautiful, but they also home 200+ years of history. You’ll find the Gloucester Waterways Museum in one of the renovated warehouse which includes a host of interactive and fun exhibits ensuring the whole family have fun, for just *£20.00. With plenty of eateries nearby as well as other attractions such as boat tours and independent shops, we know you’ll have a fabulous time at the Gloucester Docks.


Fashion Museum, Bath

Mannequin at the Bath Fashion Museum

If you’re headed for Bath during your stay in the Cotswolds, the impressive Bath Assembly Rooms house the iconic Fashion Museum. Fashionistas and art lovers alike will enjoy discovering iconic attire from the last 400 years, with plenty of dressing up opportunities for the kids too. Take a step back in time and discover Queen Alexandra’s lost dresses right the way through to current fashion trends and ‘Dress of the Year 2017’. A *£29.00 ticket will transform your trip from culture to couture.


Why not consider a Saver Ticket? Granting access to the Roman Baths, Fashion Museum and Victoria Art Gallery for just £58.00, a saver ticket guarantees a fantastic day out in Bath for the whole family.


* Prices correct for a family consisting of 2 adults and 2 children as of 23rd November 2018.
Image credits:  Elliot Brown – (CC BY 2.0); Eric Molina (CC BY 2.0)