All Cotswold locations

Tetbury

 

Tetbury is one of the most beautiful (and still relatively unknown) Cotswold towns. It has many very elegant buildings all which create this timeless beauty — a delight for those who visit this hidden jewel of the Cotswolds. It is a thriving market town built around its outstanding seventeenth century Market Hall. As well as offering a unique retail experience with many individually owned shops, it is also a major centre for antiques.   Tetbury has also been the winner of Gloucestershire’s  Best Market  Town Award.

With one of the tallest spires in the UK, the Georgian Gothic church - together with Tetbury’s many other listed buildings - make the town a designated outstanding conservation area.
Tetbury is world-renowned for its unique Royal associations. Highgrove, home of HRH The Prince of Wales is situated just outside Tetbury, and Gatcombe Park, home of the Princess Royal is also nearby. 
Whatever your wish, Tetbury is in the perfect position, close to an array of popular attractions, offering interesting days out, fun and relaxation. There's something for everyone!

 

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Cirencester

 

Cirencester is described as The “Capital of the Cotswolds". It has the unmistakable air of a lively market town with its street market, (held in the large and impressive Market Place) is still a colourful twice-weekly feature of town life. The town's origins lie in the Roman period when it was one of the regional capitals of Roman Britain. The Corinium Museum in the town tells this story, displaying reconstructions of how life was in Roman Cirencester, then known as Corinium Dobunnorum.

Located in the heart of the Cotswolds, the town is excellently located for almost all of the region's attractions. There is a wide variety of shops, restaurants and much more making it well worth at least a visit as part of your stay in the Cotswolds.

 

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Cirencester

 

Cirencester is described as The “Capital of the Cotswolds". It has the unmistakable air of a lively market town with its street market, (held in the large and impressive Market Place) is still a colourful twice-weekly feature of town life. The town's origins lie in the Roman period when it was one of the regional capitals of Roman Britain. The Corinium Museum in the town tells this story, displaying reconstructions of how life was in Roman Cirencester, then known as Corinium Dobunnorum.

Located in the heart of the Cotswolds, the town is excellently located for almost all of the region's attractions. There is a wide variety of shops, restaurants and much more making it well worth at least a visit as part of your stay in the Cotswolds.

 

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Burford

 

Burford is justifiably one of the most picturesque towns in England (Forbes 5th Best place to live in the World!). With its medieval bridge, old stone houses and attractive Tudor and Georgian frontages, the town looks as attractive today as it did 500 years ago - it was an important regional crossroads and wealthy wool town. 

Little in Burford has changed over the centuries, and today remains very popular, both for its beauty and history but also for its shopping and antiques, as well the wide variety of places to eat, including restaurants, pubs and teashops.

 

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Stow On The Wold

 

Stow on the Wold, for many people, is the most easily recognisable of Cotswold towns or locations. It is renowned specifically for the antiques shops as well as its delightful Market Square, cafes, excellent pubs and attractive buildings. It is situated on the Roman Fosse Way, and has a long history with origins as a prehistoric fortified settlement on top of the hill.

The Market Square is large and impressive and, surrounded by houses, shops and inns all built in the local Cotswold stone, it gives the feeling of being the focus of town life over many centuries. At nearly 800ft, Stow-on-the-Wold is the highest of the Cotswold towns, approached uphill from all directions.

 

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Woodstock

 

Woodstock, situated on the edge of the Oxfordshire Cotswolds, is just 8 miles outside the 'dreaming spires' of Oxford - one of Englands most attractive cities. Woodstock is particularly renowned for its association with Sir Winston Churchill and especially where he was born - Blenheim Palace.

It is a fine Georgian town containing many attractive period buildings: including the 17th century Fletcher’s House, home to the excellent Oxfordshire Museum and a Visitor Information Point, the 18th century Town Hall and the Church of St Mary Magdalene.

Woodstock has excellent antique shops as well as an interesting selection of other shops and galleries, plus some excellent pubs and restaurants. The Kings Head, The Black Prince and The Malborough Arms are all favourites with us.

 

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Bourton On The Water

 

Bourton-on-the-Water is perhaps one of the Cotswolds most famouns locations. Located 4 miles from Stow-on-the-Wold it straddles the River Windrush with its series of attractive low bridges all set aside neat greens and tidy stone banks. Clustered around the river are traditional Cotswolds buildings, many of which are now tourist shops for the day-trippers and visitors. Bourton is sometimes described as the 'Little Venice' of the Cotswolds and is one of the most popular tourist spots in the region being serviced by the many shops, cafe's, and attractions.

There are many attractions within the village including Birdland, an authentic zoo for birds, with a remarkable collection of penguins, some of which have come from the owner's islands in the South Atlantic. Unsurprisingly there are many more and also within easy driving distance are many Cotswold Gardens including those found at Hidcote Manor, Snowshill Manor, Bourton House, Sezincote, Kiftsgate Court and Batsford Arboretum.

 

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Burford

 

Burford is justifiably one of the most picturesque towns in England (Forbes 5th Best place to live in the World!). With its medieval bridge, old stone houses and attractive Tudor and Georgian frontages, the town looks as attractive today as it did 500 years ago - it was an important regional crossroads and wealthy wool town. 

Little in Burford has changed over the centuries, and today remains very popular, both for its beauty and history but also for its shopping and antiques, as well the wide variety of places to eat, including restaurants, pubs and teashops.

 

View accommodation in Burford

Woodstock

 

Woodstock, situated on the edge of the Oxfordshire Cotswolds, is just 8 miles outside the 'dreaming spires' of Oxford - one of Englands most attractive cities. Woodstock is particularly renowned for its association with Sir Winston Churchill and especially where he was born - Blenheim Palace.

It is a fine Georgian town containing many attractive period buildings: including the 17th century Fletcher’s House, home to the excellent Oxfordshire Museum and a Visitor Information Point, the 18th century Town Hall and the Church of St Mary Magdalene.

Woodstock has excellent antique shops as well as an interesting selection of other shops and galleries, plus some excellent pubs and restaurants. The Kings Head, The Black Prince and The Malborough Arms are all favourites with us.

 

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Cotswold Water Park

 

The Cotswold Water Park is NOT what you might think! There are no water slides, log flumes or similar, it is in fact a collection of 150 lakes, making it one of the UK's largest Nature Reserves with many species previously lost being reintroduced successfully into the wild. Its development into what it is today started only 50 years ago when the gravel extraction commenced, leaving huge lakes ideal of a variety of uses including natural redeveopment, some water activities(fishing, sailing etc) and a generally a peaceful environment.

The Water Park is the catchment area of the Upper Thames and over millions of years, vast deposits of sand & gravel were laid down here as the Cotswolds were eroded into the Thames. There are a number of villages which sit either in the designated 'Cotswold Water Park' or just outside it. While there is still some gravel extraction, today the area is best known as a Site of Specific Interest for its geology and various Nature Reserves providing protected areas for endangered wildlife.

 

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Aston

 

The village of Aston, four miles south of Witney, is a small working village within the Oxfordshire Cotswolds. it is centred around the Square - which is actually a triangle, and has a number of very good facilities for holiday guests. Aston is often linked with the neighbouring hamlet of Cote, (we're not sure why!) but overall this village has all the essentials of village life - a church, a school, a post office, a general store and a pub.

The village is also home to the popular Aston Pottery and nearby you will find Chimney Meadows, a 250 hectare nature reserve, rich in wildlife, along the banks of the Thames

 

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Bourton On The Water

 

Bourton-on-the-Water is perhaps one of the Cotswolds most famouns locations. Located 4 miles from Stow-on-the-Wold it straddles the River Windrush with its series of attractive low bridges all set aside neat greens and tidy stone banks. Clustered around the river are traditional Cotswolds buildings, many of which are now tourist shops for the day-trippers and visitors. Bourton is sometimes described as the 'Little Venice' of the Cotswolds and is one of the most popular tourist spots in the region being serviced by the many shops, cafe's, and attractions.

There are many attractions within the village including Birdland, an authentic zoo for birds, with a remarkable collection of penguins, some of which have come from the owner's islands in the South Atlantic. Unsurprisingly there are many more and also within easy driving distance are many Cotswold Gardens including those found at Hidcote Manor, Snowshill Manor, Bourton House, Sezincote, Kiftsgate Court and Batsford Arboretum.

 

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Stratford Upon Avon

 

Accommodation in Stratford Upon Avon is easily accessible by rail, road and air and is quintessentially  Olde England.  Based in the beautiful Warwickshire countryside, the town is riddled with tales. Famously known as the birthplace of William Shakespeare, Stratford Upon Avon boasts being a market town with over 800 years history and one that will transport you back in time with its architecture, theatres and historical places to visit. Read our guide to Stratford Upon Avon

 

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Broadway

 

Broadway, quite simply, is world famous and regarded as one of the most beautiful villages in Britain with it's numerous Cotswold stone houses and cottages, ancient chestnut trees and impressive High Street. Broadway has sometimes been described as the 'Jewel of the Cotswolds' due in the main to its stunning look and presentation. The name 'Broad Way' is due to the wide main street centred around The Village Green which is lined with red chestnut trees and many classic Cotswold stone buildings, some dating as far back as the 16th century.

The village has some excellent pubs, The Swan and The Crown and Trumpet to name two along with a very famous hotel TheLygon Arms, which does quality food. The High Street is very long and at the Upper End it really is quite stunning, almost dreamy and to good to be true! There are some very good shops especially antique shops.

The region around Broadway is similarly gorgeous, with some amazing villages. We particularly recommedn Stanton, Stanway and Snowshill as worth visiting. There is a circular walk to take all of these in. (There are some good pubs along the way too.) 

Broadway is a perfect base for touring the Cotswolds, withCheltenham and Stratford-upon-Avon both only fifteen miles away. There are also many National Trust properties and gardens nearby, with a wealth of places of interest and historic towns. For those who prefer to explore the area in depth there are many areas to go walking with Broadway also being on the Cotswold Way and Broadway Tower (at the top of Fish Hill) offering one of the most spectular views of the Cotswolds. A must visit location!!

 

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Chippenham

 

Chippenham is an historic market town with many architectural gems. It is near some of the country’s greatest houses and historic villages, making it an ideal location for touring the southern Cotswolds. It is set on the River Avon and lies between the Malborough Downs, the Cotswolds and Salisbury Plain. Surrounding there are a number of stone-built Cotswold villages villages, including Lacock (National Trust), Biddestone and Castle Combe. The great house and art treasures of LongleatBowoodLacock Abbey,Sheldon Manor and Corsham Court are within easy reach

Chippenham hosts a many established annual events, including a variety of unique celebrations: Shrove Tuesday heralds the annual Pancake Races in the High Street, there is the popular Folk Festival occurs over the second May Bank Holiday. September is the Chippenham Fishing Match together with the Beer Festival. A great location! 

 

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Moreton In Marsh

 

Moreton in Marsh, one of the northern Cotswolds most active market towns is located at the head of the beautiful Evenlode valley. It is a thriving market town with a history dating back over 1000 years to the Saxon era. Its broad High Street is lined with elegant 17th and 18th Century buildings, among them the White Hart Royal, a former manor house in which King Charles I sheltered during the Civil War.

The town has a wide range of shops including antiques, resturants, pubs and inns, plus many other useful shops. More of an active and 'locals' town, it has, every Tuesday, the largest open-air street market in the Cotswolds. It is also the venue for a successful one-day agricultural show held on the first Saturday in September - The Moreton Show. There are many attractions within a short drive including Batsford Arboretum, Bourton House Garden, 
Cotswold Falconry Centre and the Cotswold Farm Park.

 

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Painswick

 

Painswick is a stunning village-come-town located deep in the Cotswolds countryside and rolling hills. Sometimes described as theQueen of the Cotswolds it has a long history (once it was the main wool town) and some gorgeous architecture in fact many of the historic buildings here are built using stone from local Painswick quarries.   

Today it has the oldest building in England to hold a Post Office as well as the oldest bowling green in England. The stunning church 'The Church of St Mary' (originally Norman) was extended circa 1480 while the churchyard is famous for its 99 yew trees, legend has it that the 100th won't grow. A closer look at the church tower still reveals traces of Painswick's role in the Civil War

There are many small shops and galleries to browse plus with pubs, restaurants and tea shops that serve good food.

 

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Moreton In Marsh

 

Moreton in Marsh, one of the northern Cotswolds most active market towns is located at the head of the beautiful Evenlode valley. It is a thriving market town with a history dating back over 1000 years to the Saxon era. Its broad High Street is lined with elegant 17th and 18th Century buildings, among them the White Hart Royal, a former manor house in which King Charles I sheltered during the Civil War.

The town has a wide range of shops including antiques, resturants, pubs and inns, plus many other useful shops. More of an active and 'locals' town, it has, every Tuesday, the largest open-air street market in the Cotswolds. It is also the venue for a successful one-day agricultural show held on the first Saturday in September - The Moreton Show. There are many attractions within a short drive including Batsford Arboretum, Bourton House Garden, 
Cotswold Falconry Centre and the Cotswold Farm Park.

 

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Woodstock

 

Woodstock, situated on the edge of the Oxfordshire Cotswolds, is just 8 miles outside the 'dreaming spires' of Oxford - one of Englands most attractive cities. Woodstock is particularly renowned for its association with Sir Winston Churchill and especially where he was born - Blenheim Palace.

It is a fine Georgian town containing many attractive period buildings: including the 17th century Fletcher’s House, home to the excellent Oxfordshire Museum and a Visitor Information Point, the 18th century Town Hall and the Church of St Mary Magdalene.

Woodstock has excellent antique shops as well as an interesting selection of other shops and galleries, plus some excellent pubs and restaurants. The Kings Head, The Black Prince and The Malborough Arms are all favourites with us.

 

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Chipping Norton

 

Chipping Norton is situated at the highest point in the Oxfordshire Cotswolds. Once a centre for the Cotswold wool trade the town has a history dating back over 800 years with many buildings showing the prosperity that the wool brought. Later, sheep farming was largely replaced by arable, but agriculture remained important in this part of the Oxfordshire Cotswolds. Many of the original houses around the market place were rebuilt in the 18th century with fashionable Georgian frontages.

Renowned for its antique shops - Chipping Norton retains a robust living, working market town atmosphere. There is good choice of places to eat and top quality entertainment at the wonderful Theatre, famous for its pantomime and visiting world class performers. Chipping Norton is an excellent base for exploring further afield: easily accessible by road and rail, right on the edge of the Cotswolds and lying between Oxford and Stratford upon Avon.

 

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Wye Valley & Welsh Borders

 

While staying in your Wye Valley Self Catering accommodation you can choose to relax with gentle walks along the river, stroll through numerous towns such as Monmouth, Ledbury, Walford and Hay On Wye or challenge your energy levels to the extreme with many biking trails, water sports, tandem paragliding and hiking. Read our guide toWye Valley.

 

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Cotswold Water Park

 

The Cotswold Water Park is NOT what you might think! There are no water slides, log flumes or similar, it is in fact a collection of 150 lakes, making it one of the UK's largest Nature Reserves with many species previously lost being reintroduced successfully into the wild. Its development into what it is today started only 50 years ago when the gravel extraction commenced, leaving huge lakes ideal of a variety of uses including natural redeveopment, some water activities(fishing, sailing etc) and a generally a peaceful environment.

The Water Park is the catchment area of the Upper Thames and over millions of years, vast deposits of sand & gravel were laid down here as the Cotswolds were eroded into the Thames. There are a number of villages which sit either in the designated 'Cotswold Water Park' or just outside it. While there is still some gravel extraction, today the area is best known as a Site of Specific Interest for its geology and various Nature Reserves providing protected areas for endangered wildlife.

 

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Bath

 

Self Catering Cottage Accommodation in Bath. Based in the Somerset Countryside, only 100 miles west of London lies the mystical and enchanting city of Bath. A unique city renowned for its history, Georgian architecture, famous Abbey and shopping haven, Bath has attracted visitors for decades.See what having your self catering holiday in Bath can offer with our Guide to Bath.

 

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Stow On The Wold

 

Stow on the Wold, for many people, is the most easily recognisable of Cotswold towns or locations. It is renowned specifically for the antiques shops as well as its delightful Market Square, cafes, excellent pubs and attractive buildings. It is situated on the Roman Fosse Way, and has a long history with origins as a prehistoric fortified settlement on top of the hill.

The Market Square is large and impressive and, surrounded by houses, shops and inns all built in the local Cotswold

Bath

Our quality self catering holiday cottages in Bath offer the perfect accommodation to enjoy your break away.

Based in the Somerset Countryside, only 100 miles west of London lies the mystical and enchanting city of Bath. A unique city renowned for its history, Georgian architecture, famous Abbey and shopping haven, Bath has attracted visitors for decades.

Our Bath cottages are carefully selected to give you the very best in traditional & modern self catering accommodation, holiday homes & apartments.

Take a look at our local properties below or use the search facility on the right to narrow down the results to find your perfect accommodation.

One you have decided and booked your Holiday cottage why not take a look at our comprehensive guide to Bath

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Bourton On The Water

Bourton-on-the-Water is perhaps one of the Cotswolds most famouns locations. Located 4 miles from Stow-on-the-Wold it straddles the River Windrush with its series of attractive low bridges all set aside neat greens and tidy stone banks. Clustered around the river are traditional Cotswolds buildings, many of which are now tourist shops for the day-trippers and visitors. Bourton is sometimes described as the 'Little Venice' of the Cotswolds and is one of the most popular tourist spots in the region being serviced by the many shops, cafe's, and attractions.

There are many attractions within the village including Birdland, an authentic zoo for birds, with a remarkable collection of penguins, some of which have come from the owner's islands in the South Atlantic. Unsurprisingly there are many more and also within easy driving distance are many Cotswold Gardens including those found at Hidcote Manor, Snowshill Manor, Bourton House, Sezincote, Kiftsgate Court and Batsford Arboretum.

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Broadway

Broadway, quite simply, is world famous and regarded as one of the most beautiful villages in Britain with it's numerous Cotswold stone houses and cottages, ancient chestnut trees and impressive High Street. Broadway has sometimes been described as the 'Jewel of the Cotswolds' due in the main to its stunning look and presentation. The name 'Broad Way' is due to the wide main street centred around The Village Green which is lined with red chestnut trees and many classic Cotswold stone buildings, some dating as far back as the 16th century.

The village has some excellent pubs, The Swan and The Crown and Trumpet to name two along with a very famous hotel The Lygon Arms, which does quality food. The High Street is very long and at the Upper End it really is quite stunning, almost dreamy and to good to be true! There are some very good shops especially antique shops.

The region around Broadway is similarly gorgeous, with some amazing villages. We particularly recommedn Stanton, Stanway and Snowshill as worth visiting. There is a circular walk to take all of these in. (There are some good pubs along the way too.)

Broadway is a perfect base for touring the Cotswolds, with Cheltenham and Stratford-upon-Avon both only fifteen miles away. There are also many National Trust properties and gardens nearby, with a wealth of places of interest and historic towns. For those who prefer to explore the area in depth there are many areas to go walking with Broadway also being on the Cotswold Way and Broadway Tower (at the top of Fish Hill) offering one of the most spectular views of the Cotswolds. A must visit location!!

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Burford

Burford is justifiably one of the most picturesque towns in England (Forbes 5th Best place to live in the World!). With its medieval bridge, old stone houses and attractive Tudor and Georgian frontages, the town looks as attractive today as it did 500 years ago - it was an important regional crossroads and wealthy wool town.

Little in Burford has changed over the centuries, and today remains very popular, both for its beauty and history but also for its shopping and antiques, as well the wide variety of places to eat, including restaurants, pubs and teashops.

View accommodation in Burford

Cheltenham

Cheltenham (or Cheltenham Spa as some call it!) is one of England's most complete Regency towns. It is located less than a hundred miles from London and is an ideal base for touring the Cotswolds region as well as Stratford upon Avon and Bath.

Within the heart of the town you will find many Regency town houses, characterised by intricate ironwork balconies and painted stucco facades; there is also the historic Promenade, which is recognised as one of the most attractive parts of the town. With its award-winning gardens, impressive range of stylish shops and restaurants, and its festivals of horse racing, music and literature Cheltenham is a day trip choice that certainly gives you options.

Perhaps, however, it is best known for its association with horse racing with the world famous Cheltenham Racecourse on the edge of the town. Each year the Gold Cup is hosted here during March with the worlds best horses competing for this famous trophy.

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Chippenham

Chippenham is an historic market town with many architectural gems. It is near some of the country’s greatest houses and historic villages, making it an ideal location for touring the southern Cotswolds. It is set on the River Avon and lies between the Malborough Downs, the Cotswolds and Salisbury Plain. Surrounding there are a number of stone-built Cotswold villages villages, including Lacock (National Trust), Biddestone and Castle Combe. The great house and art treasures of Longleat, Bowood, Lacock Abbey, Sheldon Manor and Corsham Court are within easy reach

Chippenham hosts a many established annual events, including a variety of unique celebrations: Shrove Tuesday heralds the annual Pancake Races in the High Street, there is the popular Folk Festival occurs over the second May Bank Holiday. September is the Chippenham Fishing Match together with the Beer Festival. A great location! 

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Chipping Campden

Frequently described as the "jewel in the crown" of Cotswold towns, Chipping Campden is also one of the best preserved and most historically important. The High Street is lined with a range of wonderful and intriguing shops. In the town centre is the Market hall built in 1627 for the sale of butter, cheese and poultry. Chipping Campden has been thoroughly preserved and still presents the character of a Cotswold market town

There are many excellent pubs, hotels and restaurants in the village all of which are frequented by the locals and tourists equally. Located in the northern Cotswolds, it is near to a host of Cotswold treats including Broadway, Snowshill, Stanton to name a few. Probably one of the most desireable locations in the region this has to be one location that is visited during a Cotswolds holiday.

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Chipping Norton

Chipping Norton is situated at the highest point in the Oxfordshire Cotswolds. Once a centre for the Cotswold wool trade the town has a history dating back over 800 years with many buildings showing the prosperity that the wool brought. Later, sheep farming was largely replaced by arable, but agriculture remained important in this part of the Oxfordshire Cotswolds. Many of the original houses around the market place were rebuilt in the 18th century with fashionable Georgian frontages.

Renowned for its antique shops - Chipping Norton retains a robust living, working market town atmosphere. There is good choice of places to eat and top quality entertainment at the wonderful Theatre, famous for its pantomime and visiting world class performers. Chipping Norton is an excellent base for exploring further afield: easily accessible by road and rail, right on the edge of the Cotswolds and lying between Oxford and Stratford upon Avon.

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Cirencester

Cirencester is described as The “Capital of the Cotswolds". It has the unmistakable air of a lively market town with its street market, (held in the large and impressive Market Place) is still a colourful twice-weekly feature of town life. The town's origins lie in the Roman period when it was one of the regional capitals of Roman Britain. The Corinium Museum in the town tells this story, displaying reconstructions of how life was in Roman Cirencester, then known as Corinium Dobunnorum.

Located in the heart of the Cotswolds, the town is excellently located for almost all of the region's attractions. There is a wide variety of shops, restaurants and much more making it well worth at least a visit as part of your stay in the Cotswolds.

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Cotswold Water Park

The Cotswold Water Park is NOT what you might think! There are no water slides, log flumes or similar, it is in fact a collection of 150 lakes, making it one of the UK's largest Nature Reserves with many species previously lost being reintroduced successfully into the wild. Its development into what it is today started only 50 years ago when the gravel extraction commenced, leaving huge lakes ideal of a variety of uses including natural redeveopment, some water activities(fishing, sailing etc) and a generally a peaceful environment.

The Water Park is the catchment area of the Upper Thames and over millions of years, vast deposits of sand & gravel were laid down here as the Cotswolds were eroded into the Thames. There are a number of villages which sit either in the designated 'Cotswold Water Park' or just outside it. While there is still some gravel extraction, today the area is best known as a Site of Specific Interest for its geology and various Nature Reserves providing protected areas for endangered wildlife.

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Fairford

Fairford is a small town (big village in our opinion!) situated half way between Cirencester and Lechlade on Thames. The 'town' lies in the Cotswolds on the River Coln, surrounded by some of the most attractive countryside and beautiful villages. The Cotswold Water Park is within a very short drive, a large lake area renowned for its conservation projects and ecological focus.

Within Fairford is a delight Market Place, which has a small selection of attractive shops, including the important necessities as well as an excellent restaurant Allium and a good pub called The Plough.

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Hay On Wye

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Lechlade On Thames

Lechlade on Thames is a small market town (or big village!) perched on the River Thames on the Gloucestershire and Wiltshire border, roughly in the southern Cotswolds. Lechlade is so called  because it is near to the River Leach which joins the Thames nearby. Set in an area of outstanding natural beauty, it is still within easy access to Swindon, Cirencester, Cheltenham, Burford and Oxford.

The town has a good selection of pubs and shops but these are more of a convenience nature than as a shopping hub! Although it isn't true Cotswolds' countryside, it is an attractive area with some super surrounding villages. Examples include Southrop (wow!) Little Faringdon, The Eastleach villages and also Clanfield, all well worth a little look.

Lechlade is also close to the Cotswold Lakes / Cotswold Water Park which offers a huge amount of things to do depending on your taste. We'd say that this is a relatively unknown area in this region, but one you should visit if possible.

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Ledbury

Ledbury is one of England's text book black and white market towns, full of stunning examples of timber-framed buildings. The 17th century black & white Market House, which had originally served as a grain store dominates the town centre,and is supported on pillars of chestnut. It was completed in 1653 by John Abel, the Kings carpenter, another fine example of black & white architecture is The Feather's Hotel on the High Street

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Lower Brailes

Lower Brailes is an attractive village situated at the northern tip of the Cotswolds, on the edge of Oxfordshire and Warwickshire. The 'area' of Brailes comprises of Lower and Upper Brailes, Sutton under Brailes and also a sweet little hamlet called Winderton.

Lower Brailes is probably the largests of the three villages, comprising a local shop, small hotel and pub. It enjoys a rural setting and is within an an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty - but is equally well positioned for access to the motorway network and specifically the M40. The village has a long history with some very old family names dating back hundreds of years still living locally. That suggests it can't be a bad place to live  - or holiday in!

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Malmesbury

Malmesbury is a small yet ancient market town, located in the southern Cotswold with a history dating from the 5th Century. The town is the oldest borough in England, having been granted its charter by King Edward in 924. Malmesbury also boasts having England's oldest hotel, the Old Bell which has been offering bed and board since 1220.

The town offers a wealth of 17th and 18th century buildings, many of which are now host to bright and friendly shops and inns. It is famous for its 7th Century Abbey and Gardens including its extensive collection of roses. With the abbey as dramatic backdrop its five acres feature more than 10,000 plant varieties spread between formal gardens dotted with fish ponds and a wilder section that cascades into a valley cut through by a tributary of the River Avon

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Moreton In Marsh

Moreton in Marsh, one of the northern Cotswolds most active market towns is located at the head of the beautiful Evenlode valley. It is a thriving market town with a history dating back over 1000 years to the Saxon era. Its broad High Street is lined with elegant 17th and 18th Century buildings, among them the White Hart Royal, a former manor house in which King Charles I sheltered during the Civil War.

The town has a wide range of shops including antiques, resturants, pubs and inns, plus many other useful shops. More of an active and 'locals' town, it has, every Tuesday, the largest open-air street market in the Cotswolds. It is also the venue for a successful one-day agricultural show held on the first Saturday in September - The Moreton Show. There are many attractions within a short drive including Batsford Arboretum, Bourton House Garden,
Cotswold Falconry Centre and the Cotswold Farm Park.

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Nailsworth

Nailsworth is a small town set in a valley in the heart of the southern Cotswolds. It is located approx four miles from Stroud. It is a meeting place of three valleys which branch off towards Avening, Horsley and Stroud. There is a wide variety of shops and places of interest including some excellent restaurants and cafes. There is good access to Bath to the south and Cheltenham to the north making it an ideal base to explore the Cotswolds' countryside.

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Northleach

Northleach is a small market town situated deep in the Cotswolds' hills, approximately 20 minutes to the west of Burford and 15 mins to the east of Cheltenham. It is in the county of Gloucestershire. Although it is probably best to reach the location by car, the nearest train stations are either Charlbury or Moreton in Marsh, both of which are about 30 mins away.

Although it is described as a 'town', like so many other places in the Cotswolds, it is more like a big village - there is a small market square with some simple but attractive shops including a wine store, cafe, newsagents and butchers. It also, fortunately, has one of the Cotswolds' best pubs, one which has one many awards - The Wheatsheaf and one which is owned by the people who run The Chequers in Churchill (another excellent pub). There are two other, good pubs The Red Lion and The Sherborne Inn.

The town/village has a magnificent church, descibed by some as the Cathedral of the Cotswolds, and when you see it you will understand why. The reason for such a church is primarily due to the fact that Northleach was once a major hub for the wool trade, given its location just off the Fosse Way.

We have a selection of cottages in the surrounding villages, including the amazing Notgrove Estate, please click for further details

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Painswick

Painswick is a stunning village-come-town located deep in the Cotswolds countryside and rolling hills. Sometimes described as the Queen of the Cotswolds it has a long history (once it was the main wool town) and some gorgeous architecture in fact many of the historic buildings here are built using stone from local Painswick quarries.   

Today it has the oldest building in England to hold a Post Office as well as the oldest bowling green in England. The stunning church 'The Church of St Mary' (originally Norman) was extended circa 1480 while the churchyard is famous for its 99 yew trees, legend has it that the 100th won't grow. A closer look at the church tower still reveals traces of Painswick's role in the Civil War.

There are many small shops and galleries to browse plus with pubs, restaurants and tea shops that serve good food.

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Raglan

Raglan is a busy and popular village with a thriving village community, set deep in Monmouthshire countrsyide. The village has a long history and today is probably best known for the Raglan Castle which is a popular tourist spot. There are a host of amenities to choose from including a recommended local pub

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Ross On Wye

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Somerford Keynes

Somerford Keynes is a small village located within the Cotswold Water Park just 5 miles to the south of Cirencester. It has a long history dating back thousands of years and today it has many classic Cotswolds cottages houses giving it a real traditional appeal. To the south of the village is the Lower Mill Estate a small development of holiday homes located around various lakes.

Somerford Keynes is also one of the main tributaries of the River Thames, although here is it is only a small stream! There is a small local pub, which is recommended.

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Stow On The Wold

Stow on the Wold, for many people, is the most easily recognisable of Cotswold towns or locations. It is renowned specifically for the antiques shops as well as its delightful Market Square, cafes, excellent pubs and attractive buildings. It is situated on the Roman Fosse Way, and has a long history with origins as a prehistoric fortified settlement on top of the hill.

The Market Square is large and impressive and, surrounded by houses, shops and inns all built in the local Cotswold stone, it gives the feeling of being the focus of town life over many centuries. At nearly 800ft, Stow-on-the-Wold is the highest of the Cotswold towns, approached uphill from all directions.

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Stratford Upon Avon

Accommodation in Stratford Upon Avon is easily accessible by rail, road and air and is quintessentially  Olde England.  Based in the beautiful Warwickshire countryside, the town is riddled with tales. Famously known as the birthplace of William Shakespeare, Stratford Upon Avon boasts being a market town with over 800 years history and one that will transport you back in time with its architecture, theatres and historical places to visit. Read our guide to Stratford Upon Avon

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Tetbury

Tetbury is one of the most beautiful (and still relatively unknown) Cotswold towns. It has many very elegant buildings all which create this timeless beauty — a delight for those who visit this hidden jewel of the Cotswolds. It is a thriving market town built around its outstanding seventeenth century Market Hall. As well as offering a unique retail experience with many individually owned shops, it is also a major centre for antiques.   Tetbury has also been the winner of Gloucestershire’s  Best Market  Town Award.

With one of the tallest spires in the UK, the Georgian Gothic church - together with Tetbury’s many other listed buildings - make the town a designated outstanding conservation area.
Tetbury is world-renowned for its unique Royal associations. Highgrove, home of HRH The Prince of Wales is situated just outside Tetbury, and Gatcombe Park, home of the Princess Royal is also nearby.
Whatever your wish, Tetbury is in the perfect position, close to an array of popular attractions, offering interesting days out, fun and relaxation. There's something for everyone!

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Witney

Witney is a thriving and busy market town located within Oxfordshire Cotswolds. it is well known for its blanket making and in fact owes much of its prosperity to the wool trade, including examples of architecture resulting from the wealth this brought. It is the largest of the market towns in the region and has a wide variety of shops including two large supermarkets. Of particluar interest is the the 17th century Butter Cross, the fine tree-bordered green and church of St Mary the Virgin with its 150ft spire, which is the 'centre' of the town.

A long attractive high street runs from the Butter Cross and features the 18th century town hall, the Blanket Hall and the Victorian Corn Exchange. The town has a bustling atmosphere with a good range of shops, plus a twice weekly market.

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Woodstock

Woodstock, situated on the edge of the Oxfordshire Cotswolds, is just 8 miles outside the 'dreaming spires' of Oxford - one of Englands most attractive cities. Woodstock is particularly renowned for its association with Sir Winston Churchill and especially where he was born - Blenheim Palace.

It is a fine Georgian town containing many attractive period buildings: including the 17th century Fletcher’s House, home to the excellent Oxfordshire Museum and a Visitor Information Point, the 18th century Town Hall and the Church of St Mary Magdalene.

Woodstock has excellent antique shops as well as an interesting selection of other shops and galleries, plus some excellent pubs and restaurants. The Kings Head, The Black Prince and The Malborough Arms are all favourites with us.

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Wye Valley & Welsh Borders

While staying in your Wye Valley Self Catering accommodation you can choose to relax with gentle walks along the river, stroll through numerous towns such as Monmouth, Ledbury, Walford and Hay On Wye or challenge your energy levels to the extreme with many biking trails, water sports, tandem paragliding and hiking. Read our guide to Wye Valley.

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Short Breaks

All our Cotswolds Cottages offer short breaks, however please note that there are restrictions at certain times of the year, particularly in School Holidays. Please contact us for full details as price and availability will vary from the website.